Here’s a scenario that may be familiar to families whose adult children receive federal or state benefits, and who are concerned with how various expenses can be covered without negatively impacting those benefits.

Consider this hypothetical: It’s the start of a new school year, and your young adult son with a disability is very interested in taking a course in graphic design at a school about 50 miles away. He also is eager to live .

If you are the parent or guardian of a child or an adult with special needs, the day-to-day demands alone can be overwhelming.  Thinking about the future can seem like mission impossible. When you consider how critical you are to the daily well-being of your loved one, how will you and your family ensure their future, especially if you are not there?  

The journey to get here has been challenging and rewarding. You couldn’t be prouder of your child for successfully navigating an educational system that simply wasn’t built for him or her. You are both grateful for the services and benefits that have made it possible to succeed. And, this isn’t the end. The next step may be college. Your child may feel ready to take the intimidating plunge of life away from home, but the unknowns are many. .

If you’ve ever been faced with managing the details of administering a deceased loved one’s estate, you appreciate how confusing and stressful the entire process can be.  You probably never told yourself, “I wish my relatives had done less planning.” In fact, the more detailed and thoughtful an estate plan is, the clearer and easier it will be to follow the individual’s wishes after death.

As a parent or guardian of a child with special needs, you’ve meticulously planned and provided for your child’s educational and care needs.  Then, one day, it hits you. All too quickly your child is a teenager on the cusp of adulthood. What does life look like as your child enters those adult years? The answer will depend heavily on how you and your child plan for that future. Transition planning for life after school takes careful thought .

 

 

Age 26

Parents of a child with special needs continually look for ways to enrich the quality of their child’s life and ensure his or her future health and wellbeing.  These goals can be achieved using a variety of planning tools, some of which are driven by whether the child’s disability either arose before age 26 or is expected to continue past that age.

 

 Age 22 is relevant because there are many public benefit programs that require proof that a person’s disability arose before reaching age 22 in order to establish eligibility. 

While it may be tempting to toss or destroy yellowing medical records and other papers because they're more than three, seven, or 37 years old, you should resist the urge to purge, since it may be impossible to recreate the records years later!  Professionals who .

 

Age 21

NEWER
1 2

Attorneys
Ann N. Butenhof, CELA
Judith L. Bomster, Esquire
Judith K. Jones, Esquire

Paralegals
Sonia Gianitsis
Renee Lubinski, EA

Administrative Staff
› Denise M. Aiken – Executive Assistant/Office Manager
› Caitlin M. Nelson – Receptionist
› Debra Doyon  Accounting Manager
› Natasha Winslow - Clerk