Susan’s mother had always been extremely independent, working as a school superintendent well into her 70's and living alone after the death of her husband over 20 years ago. Then it all changed in the space of just a few months. Her mother became forgetful, and at times would become disoriented. She had to step down from the job she loved, and it was not long before she could not safely live alone. Of her three children, two lived out of .

August 22

It happens suddenly. A formerly independent family member can no longer navigate life at home successfully without assistance. Is it time to consider moving to assisted living or a nursing home?

Not necessarily.

In fact, according to a recent AARP survey, 76% of American adults age 50 and over wanted to remain in their current residence as long as possible. In addition to the emotional and physical stress of moving, there is the comfort of .

The journey to get here has been challenging and rewarding. You couldn’t be prouder of your child for successfully navigating an educational system that simply wasn’t built for him or her. You are both grateful for the services and benefits that have made it possible to succeed. And, this isn’t the end. The next step may be college. Your child may feel ready to take the intimidating plunge of life away from home, but the unknowns are many. .

 

 

“I don’t want to worry about Medicaid and a friend said that I should buy an annuity now, should I?”

Many clients come into our office having received all kinds of advice from their friends, families and neighbors. One piece of advice that we've heard several times is “I understand that I need to buy an annuity now to protect my money in the event that my spouse goes into a nursing home in the future, is that right?” or “I’ve been told I .

A Medicaid look-back period relates to how far back the state of New Hampshire can look at your financial records to determine whether you're financially eligible for Medicaid nursing facility benefits.

 "I moved in with my parents 10 years ago.  Can their house be put into my name now that they're going into a nursing home?"

If you have moved into your parent’s home in order to provide care to them and a parent then goes into a nursing home, this can be a very scary situation. You may have given up your home, you may have moved from your own personal residence, in with your parents. There also are people that have always lived with their .

 

“I’m a personal injury attorney representing a client who suffered a disability or traumatic brain injury from an accident. What should I be aware of when seeking a settlement for my client?”

The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (“DHHS”) Medicaid program offers a number of programs that provide long term supports and services to individuals living in the community.  One such program is the Choices for Independence program or CFI, which provides services to elderly and disabled adults.   To qualify for CFI, applicants must meet certain financial and medical eligibility standards.  Financial eligibility is based .

 

“My spouse and I are divorcing, but I am disabled and have high medical costs. How can I make sure that I don’t lose eligibility for my disability benefits? How does alimony factor into the eligibility requirements for disability benefits?”

 

 

‘I’ve heard about a Medicaid spend-down –

what is that?”

 

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Attorneys
Ann N. Butenhof, CELA
Judith L. Bomster, Esquire
Judith K. Jones, Esquire

Paralegals
Sonia Gianitsis
Renee Lubinski, EA

Administrative Staff
› Denise M. Aiken – Executive Assistant/Office Manager
› Caitlin M. Nelson – Receptionist
› Debra Doyon  Accounting Manager
› Natasha Winslow - Clerk