Your father recently passed away, and you’ve learned that your sister has been named executor of his estate. Where does that leave you?

If you’ve lived through the death of someone close to you, you understand how complicated estate-related questions can become.

Here’s a scenario that may be familiar to families whose adult children receive federal or state benefits, and who are concerned with how various expenses can be covered without negatively impacting those benefits.

Consider this hypothetical: It’s the start of a new school year, and your young adult son with a disability is very interested in taking a course in graphic design at a school about 50 miles away. He also is eager to live .

If you are the parent or guardian of a child or an adult with special needs, the day-to-day demands alone can be overwhelming.  Thinking about the future can seem like mission impossible. When you consider how critical you are to the daily well-being of your loved one, how will you and your family ensure their future, especially if you are not there?  

 

My dad just died and had a trust, but I’m being told that I need an executor. What does that mean?

You’re a responsible individual. You’ve done estate planning to provide for the distribution of your assets to protect those you love. If you’re like most of us, when you hear the word “asset” you think of things like your home, the money you have in the bank, or your investments. You know, all those tangible possessions that have traditionally been considered to be what makes up our property, our “wealth.” The same has been true of estate .

Question:

What is the difference between a “living will” and a “durable power of attorney for health care?”  Do I need both and, if so, which is more important?

Answer:

It is important to know about “advance directives” and how they work. Advance directives are specific instructions about the type of future medical care you want, or do not want, if you become unable to make decisions for yourself.  These are documents you prepare and sign in .

February 02

 

What is elder law and how do I find an elder law attorney?

Elder law is a focused practice for lawyers who choose to handle issues commonly faced by elderly and disabled individuals. Attorneys may advertise that they specialize in elder law if they have met specified qualifying criteria, which usually includes a written examination and evidence of extensive experience in the area.

Should you die without having executed a Last Will and Testament, New Hampshire state law directs who will receive your assets and in what amounts. Dying without a Will is called, in legal terms, dying intestate. Your death certificate will be filed with the Probate Court in order to open your estate for administration and the Court will appoint someone – usually a family member – to serve as administrator. Once the administrator has settled .

 

In New Hampshire, a child who turns eighteen (18) is considered an adult regardless of capacity. After that “magic” age, parents (or other family members or interested parties filling in the role of parents) no longer have the legal authority, without written authorization, to speak with a child’s doctors about medical treatment or work with the school system on such child’s behalf. Depending upon your child’s ability to manage his or her .

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Attorneys
Ann N. Butenhof, CELA
Judith L. Bomster, Esquire
Judith K. Jones, Esquire

Paralegals
Sonia Gianitsis
Renee Lubinski, EA

Administrative Staff
› Denise M. Aiken – Executive Assistant/Office Manager
› Caitlin M. Nelson – Receptionist
› Debra Doyon  Accounting Manager
› Natasha Winslow - Clerk