Here’s a scenario that may be familiar to families whose adult children receive federal or state benefits, and who are concerned with how various expenses can be covered without negatively impacting those benefits.

Consider this hypothetical: It’s the start of a new school year, and your young adult son with a disability is very interested in taking a course in graphic design at a school about 50 miles away. He also is eager to live .

If you’ve ever been faced with managing the details of administering a deceased loved one’s estate, you appreciate how confusing and stressful the entire process can be.  You probably never told yourself, “I wish my relatives had done less planning.” In fact, the more detailed and thoughtful an estate plan is, the clearer and easier it will be to follow the individual’s wishes after death.

 

“I’m a personal injury attorney representing a client who suffered a disability or traumatic brain injury from an accident. What should I be aware of when seeking a settlement for my client?”

 

 

New Hampshire has partnered with the State of Ohio to offer ABLE accounts for New Hampshire residents under a new program called STABLE NH.  These accounts will be managed by Ohio’s STABLE program, which offers ABLE accounts to individuals with disabilities nationwide.  Although New Hampshire residents have been able to enroll in Ohio’s STABLE program since its inception, once STABLE NH launches, New Hampshire residents will be eligible to .

After years of planning by the disability community and with strong bipartisan support, the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was signed into law on December 19, 2014. This federal statute added a tool to the planning options available to persons with  disabilities,  and is codified at 26 U.S.C. §529A. Before ABLE accounts may be created, a state must pass legislation establishing a Qualified ABLE Program to administer the  .

March 18

The Achieving Better Life Experience Act (ABLE), was signed into law on December 19, 2014. Once a state has passed legislation implementing an ABLE account program and the Treasury Department issues regulations, persons with disabilities may own and control one tax-exempt savings account for the payment of qualified disability-related expenses. ABLE account funds generally will not count toward income and resource limits for federal .

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Attorneys
Ann N. Butenhof, CELA
Judith L. Bomster, Esquire
Judith K. Jones, Esquire

Paralegals
Sonia Gianitsis
Renee Lubinski, EA

Administrative Staff
› Denise M. Aiken – Executive Assistant/Office Manager
› Caitlin M. Nelson – Receptionist
› Debra Doyon  Accounting Manager
› Natasha Winslow - Clerk