The best way to take full advantage of your Medicare benefits is to be aware of the terms of your coverage. A summary of general Medicare coverage information for 2017 is available online at:  https://www.medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/10050-Medicare-and-You.pdf.

 

Persons with disabilities will soon be able to create self-settled special needs trusts on their own behalf under 42 U.S.C. 1396p(d)(4)(A). Under current law, creation of such a trust required the signature of a parent, grandparent or legal guardian, or court approval. 

Should you die without having executed a Last Will and Testament, New Hampshire state law directs who will receive your assets and in what amounts. Dying without a Will is called, in legal terms, dying intestate. Your death certificate will be filed with the Probate Court in order to open your estate for administration and the Court will appoint someone – usually a family member – to serve as administrator. Once the administrator has settled .

You can find our latest article on the NH Bar website online at https://www.nhbar.org/publications/display-news-issue.asp?id=8317

Beneficiaries of irrevocable trusts and trustees administering assets for individuals who rely on public benefits based on financial need, such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), may be interested in a recent Social Security Administration (SSA) publication of internal instructions (an "Emergency Message - EM").  EM-16012 instructs SSA staff to provide more detail regarding the reasoning for an agency decision when a trust, such as a .

February 17

 

It is not uncommon to be confused about the difference between Medicare and Medicaid.  Although these two programs have similar sounding names, and are administered by the same federal agency, these programs are very different.  One major difference between Medicare and Medicaid is that Medicare does not have a financial eligibility test; individuals who are disabled or reach retirement age, qualify for Medicare based on work history.  In .

 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) recently announced the 2016 annual Medicare premiums and deductibles.    

 

Please see our most recent article in the August, 2015 NH Bar News.

 

In New Hampshire, a child who turns eighteen (18) is considered an adult regardless of capacity. After that “magic” age, parents (or other family members or interested parties filling in the role of parents) no longer have the legal authority, without written authorization, to speak with a child’s doctors about medical treatment or work with the school system on such child’s behalf. Depending upon your child’s ability to manage his or her .

Attorneys
Ann N. Butenhof, CELA
Judith L. Bomster, Esquire
Judith K. Jones, Esquire

Paralegals
Sonia Gianitsis
Renee Lubinski, EA

Administrative Staff
› Denise M. Aiken – Executive Assistant/Office Manager
› Caitlin M. Nelson – Receptionist
› Debra Doyon  Accounting Manager
› Natasha Winslow - Clerk