If you are the parent or guardian of a child or an adult with special needs, the day-to-day demands alone can be overwhelming.  Thinking about the future can seem like mission impossible. When you consider how critical you are to the daily well-being of your loved one, how will you and your family ensure their future, especially if you are not there?  

August 22

It happens suddenly. A formerly independent family member can no longer successfully navigate life at home without assistance. Is it time to consider moving to assisted living or a nursing home?

Not necessarily.

In fact, according to a recent AARP survey of American adults, 76% of those age 50 and over wanted to remain in their current residence as long as possible. In addition to the emotional and physical stress of moving, there is the .

The journey to get here has been challenging and rewarding. You couldn’t be prouder of your child for successfully navigating an educational system that simply wasn’t built for him or her. You are both grateful for the services and benefits that have made it possible to succeed. And, this isn’t the end. The next step may be college. Your child may feel ready to take the intimidating plunge of life away from home, but the unknowns are many. .

If you’ve ever been faced with managing the details of administering a deceased loved one’s estate, you appreciate how confusing and stressful the entire process can be.  You probably never told yourself, “I wish my relatives had done less planning.” In fact, the more detailed and thoughtful an estate plan is, the clearer and easier it will be to follow the individual’s wishes after death.

As a parent or guardian of a child with special needs, you’ve meticulously planned and provided for your child’s educational and care needs.  Then, one day, it hits you. All too quickly your child is a teenager on the cusp of adulthood. What does life look like as your child enters those adult years? The answer will depend heavily on how you and your child plan for that future. Transition planning for life after school takes careful thought .

 

 

“I don’t want to worry about Medicaid and a friend said that I should buy an annuity now, should I?”

Many clients come into our office having received all kinds of advice from their friends, families and neighbors. One piece of advice that we've heard several times is “I understand that I need to buy an annuity now to protect my money in the event that my spouse goes into a nursing home in the future, is that right?” or “I’ve been told I .

 

“I’m my dad’s agent under a Power of Attorney and he is no longer competent. My sister needs money and keeps asking for information. Do I need to provide information to her?”

 

My dad just died and had a trust, but I’m being told that I need an executor. What does that mean?

January 10

 

I was told I need a trust. What is it, and why would I need one?

 

Providing for a child or adult with special needs requires meticulous planning. Once families have created their special needs trust, ensured medical benefits are in place and preserved, and selected a capable trustee to manage their loved one’s assets or inheritance, what else is needed? The answer perhaps is one of the most important pieces – not a formal legal document, but something much more personal—the “letter of intent.”  For .

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Attorneys
Ann N. Butenhof, CELA
Judith L. Bomster, Esquire
Judith K. Jones, Esquire

Paralegals
Sonia Gianitsis
Renee Lubinski, EA

Administrative Staff
› Denise M. Aiken – Executive Assistant/Office Manager
› Caitlin M. Nelson – Receptionist
› Debra Doyon  Accounting Manager
› Natasha Winslow - Clerk