“My mom died and my sister is the trustee. I’m not getting any information. What should I do?”

 

 

 

 

You’re a responsible individual. You’ve done estate planning to provide for the distribution of your assets to protect those you love. If you’re like most of us, when you hear the word “asset” you think of things like your home, the money you have in the bank, or your investments. You know, all those tangible possessions that have traditionally been considered to be what makes up our property, our “wealth.” The same has been true of estate .

Age 26

Parents of a child with special needs continually look for ways to enrich the quality of their child’s life and ensure his or her future health and wellbeing.  These goals can be achieved using a variety of planning tools, some of which are driven by whether the child’s disability either arose before age 26 or is expected to continue past that age.

 

 

“My parents have always had separate investment accounts. Dad is being admitted to a nursing home, but mom will be able to keep her account, right?”

 Age 22 is relevant because there are many public benefit programs that require proof that a person’s disability arose before reaching age 22 in order to establish eligibility. 

While it may be tempting to toss or destroy yellowing medical records and other papers because they're more than three, seven, or 37 years old, you should resist the urge to purge, since it may be impossible to recreate the records years later!  Professionals who .

NEWER
1 2 3 4 5

Attorneys
Ann N. Butenhof, CELA
Judith L. Bomster, Esquire
Judith K. Jones, Esquire

Paralegals
Sonia Gianitsis
Renee Lubinski, EA

Administrative Staff
› Denise M. Aiken – Executive Assistant/Office Manager
› Caitlin M. Nelson – Receptionist
› Debra Doyon  Accounting Manager
› Mary Smith  Clerk